====Aesop's Fables's Quotes: Part 1====
  • Those who attempt to act in disguise are apt to overdo it.
  • What is most truly valuable is often underrated.
  • A fair face is of little use without sense.
  • We should not wait till a person is dead, to give him our respect.
  • The tyrant will always find a pretext for his tyranny, and it is useless for the innocent to try be reasoning to get justice, when the oppressor intends to be unjust.
  • Danger sometimes comes from a source that is least suspected.
  • Those who try to entrap others often get caught by their own schemes.
  • Harm hatch, harm catch.
  • Who acts in haste repents at leisure.
  • Men are apt to condemn in others the very things they practice themselves.
  • We are encouraged by seeing others that are worse off than ourselves.
  • Those who strive are often then watched by others who will take advantage of their defeat to benefit themselves.
  • Those who achieve notoriety often mistake it for fame.
  • Those who pretend to mend others should first mend themselves, and then they will more readily believed.
  • Traitors most except treachery.
  • Hypocritical speeches are easily seen through.
  • Equals make the best friends.
  • Unawful acts to escape trials only increases our troubles.
  • Acquaintance softens prejudices.
  • Better a little in safety, than abundance surrounded by danger.
  • He who begins to tell falsehoods is obliged to tell others to make them appear true, and, sooner or later, they will get him into trouble.
  • Strangers should avoid those who quarrel among themselves.
  • Whatever you do, do with all your might.
  • He who indicates strife is as guilty as they who strive.
  • Beware of unequal matches. Alliances prompted by ambition often prove fatal.
  • Be not hasty to envy the condition of others.
  • Hope not to succeed in burrowed plumes.
  • Count not your chickens before they hatched.
  • Those who do not know their own right place must be taught.
  • A man who talks for both sides is not to be trusted by either.
  • Stoop to conquer.
  • Be not haste to believe what is said in anger or thoughtlessness.
  • The voices we teach may be practiced inst us.
  • To enjoy our blessings we must have freedom.
  • We should not think wholly of ourselves, and we should remember that life is uncertain.
  • Keep to your place, if you would succeed.
  • He who often seeks to injure others, often injures only himself.

Aesop's Fables's Quotes: Part 2

  • Let every one stick to his own element.
  • Let those who propose be willing to perform.
  • Pride goes before destruction.
  • What we do in sport often makes great trouble for others.
  • Example is more powerful than precept.
  • An evil mind will show evil action, sooner or later.
  • One story is good until another is told.
  • Impossible things we cannot hope to attain, and it is of no use to try.
  • Those who practice deceit must expect to be shunned.
  • Like will draw like.
  • No one should be blamed for his infirmities.
  • Necessity is the mother of invention.
  • Every one to his taste: one man's meat is another man's poison, and one man's poison is another man's meat; what is rejected by one person may be valued highly by another.
  • One thief is no better than another.
  • We had better bear our troubles bravely than to try to escape them.
  • In yielding the rights of others, we may endanger our own.
  • Our mere anticipations of life outrun its realities.
  • Every man should be content to mind his own business.
  • It is absurd to ape our betters.
  • Because we are like the great in one respect we must not think we are like them in all.
  • Nothing can compensate us for the loss of our liberty.
  • Promises of a suitor must be taken with caution.
  • Attempt not impossibles.
  • A man is known by the company he seeks.
  • The basest ingratitude is what injures those who serve us.
  • He who listens to flattery is not wise, for it has no good purpose.
  • Fine weather friends are not worth much.
  • We so not always like to be taken at our word.
  • People are not to be judged by their coats.
  • Don't make much ado about nothing.
  • Misfortune tests the sincerity of friends.
  • We must make friends in prosperity, if we would have their hope for your pains.
  • It is no good to envy those who make false accusation knowingly.
  • Men of evil reputation, when they perform a good deed, fail to get credit for it.
Aesop's Fables's Quotes: Part 3

  • When a coward is once found out, his pretensions of valve are useless.
  • A thief cannot be trusted, even by another thief.
  • Do nothing without regard to the consequences.
  • Retribution is certain.
  • Do not rely upon a boaster.
  • It is easy to kick a man that is down.
  • He who offers bribes needs watching, for his intentions are not honest.
  • Evil companions bring more hurt than profit.
  • Men often fall into the trap which they prepare for others.
  • Evil tendencies are shown early in life.
  • Persuasion is better than force.
  • It is hard to forget the injuries in the presence of those of him who caused the injury.
  • Do not presume to teach the elders.
  • In injuring others we are apt to receive a greater injury.
  • Cure a boaster by putting his words to the test.
  • False confidence often leads to danger.
  • The greatest braggarts are the greatest cowards.
  • Those who will sacrifice their friends to save themselves from harm are not entitled to mercy.
  • Birds of a feather flock together.
  • The perverse generally come to harm.
  • Incentive spurs effort.
  • The desire for imaginary benefits often involves the loss of present blessings.
  • We should not desire others blessings because we cannot enjoy them ourselves.
  • What seem to be a blessings are not always so.
  • A little common sense is often of more value than much cunning.
  • The misfortunes arising from a man's own misconduct are the hardest to bear.
  • Those who enter the back stairs must not complain if they are thrown out the window.
  • When you seek to change your condition, be sure that you can better it.
  • He who stops to parley with temptation, will be very likely to yield.
  • Critics are not always to be depended on.
  • Dignity cannot afford to quarrel with its inferiors.